All You Wanted for Christmas

So now we have a food baby (or two) from the Christmas over indulgence, and whilst all the celebs come out with their fitness videos and DVDs to get us back into shape, watch this little celebration of Friends and Family across 2 countries on our 8 wheels.

Special Thanks goes out to Patti and the Dublin skaters for the collab and looking after me during my time in Ireland.

Also shout out to Abi rolling her heart out over in Berlin, faithfully rocking her F’lay Tee (which you can get from our shop along with other gifts and art prints)!!

For those of you who got skates I hope this inspires you to get them onto your feel and just dance the night away!

Enjoy the rest of your Holidays! #RollOut

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Red and Green at Christmas

The Colours of Christmas

Have you ever wondered why Red and Green are commonly used to represent Christmas? Well there are many reasons which go way back into the sands of time. Most the colours and their meanings come from the western/northern European traditions and customs, when Christmas is in the middle of winter and it’s dark and cold. Here are a few with reasons with some of our own Christmas themed snaps.

Green

Green is though to represent the sign of new life. Evergreen plants, such as Holly, Ivy and Mistletoe have been used for thousands of years to decorate and brighten up buildings during the long dark winter. Evergreens also serve as a reminder to people that spring will come back soon and that winter doesn’t stick around forever!

Apparently Romans would exchange evergreen branches during January as a symbol of good luck. Even the ancient Egyptians used to bring palm branches and decorate their homes during the mid winter festivals.

In many parts of Europe during the middle ages, Paradise plays were performed, often on Christmas Eve. They told Bible stories to people who couldn’t read. The ‘Paradise Tree’ in the garden of eden in the play was normally a pine tree with red apples tied to it.

Even though today’s Christmas Trees have quirky design and new takes, they are still the most common use of green at Christmas time.

Building Christmas #dublinatchristmas #workinprogress #christmas

A photo posted by Jiggy Creationz (@jiggycreationz) on

Red

Many people associate red with the big Coca Cola trucks rolling into town blasting out the “Holidays are Coming“, however for those who see the less commercial side of Christmas, an early use of red were the apples on the paradise tree (as mentioned above). These apples (some believe they were pomegranates) are said to represent the fall of Adam in early theatre productions / plays.

Coca Cola is also (mythically) given credit for Santa’s red uniform, but one more plausible reason as to why Santy (love this new name for Santa which I picked up from our Irish roller skating team) wears red is because as a Bishop, St. Nicholas would have worn red robes!

Red is also the colour of Holly berries, which is said to represent the blood of Jesus when he died on the cross. The Holly was also represents the crown of thorns which Jesus came to wear at his crucifixion (which is Easter but never mind!).

 

More Red & Green on Insta

Love Christmas purely for the endless possibilty to take #lowlight shots that really become timestamps

A photo posted by Jiggy Creationz (@jiggycreationz) on

 

#Christmas was made for #boomberang

A video posted by Jiggy Creationz (@jiggycreationz) on

Your Christmas Colours

If you have your own ideas of colour at Christmas or what they mean, feel free to comment below.

Also don’t forget you can follow our Christmas adventure @jiggycreationz on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Pinterest

#JiggyXmas Everyone.

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Petition · European Parliament: Save the Freedom of Photography! · Change.org

On 9 July 2015, the European Parliament might destroy photography. The Freedom of taking photos in public places is under attack. Until now, in most countries in Europe you were safe to take and publish photographs that are taken from public ground – This is called Freedom of Panorama. When you were on vacation, you could take a photo from the London Eye and share it with your friends on Facebook*. If someone wanted to pay you for using this photo, that was okay as well. Both is about to change may destroy photography as we know it.   Julia Reda, member of the European Parliament, tried to bring the Freedom of Panorama to all countries of the EU , as few countries like France and Italy don’t have such law yet. In the majority of countries such as the UK, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Netherlands, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Austria and Croatia, you’re safe to take, publish and sell photos of public buildings when taken from public grounds.   However, the current draft turned the proposal upside down .  Instead of bringing the Freedom of Panorama  to the few countries that don’t know such law yet,  it would take it away from all those who do . With this, Street-, Travel- and Architecture-Photography would be dead as we know it. It is impossible to find out the architect of every public building in order to ask for permission before you can publish and possibly sell the photo.   I therefore call on the members of the European Parliament to Not limit the Freedom of Panorama in any way and instead to Bring the Freedom of Panorama to all member states of the EU so that the European Citizens can be assured to act within the law when taking and publishing photographs from public buildings anywhere in the European Union. This is necessary to embrace our European Culture and Art!   For the media, please see:  https://www.facebook.com/Sumfinity/posts/502360496584684 *As Julia Reda, member of the European Parliament, points out, even the private upload of a photograph on Facebook would need the consent of the architect, as with the upload you grant Facebook a license to commercially use the photograph.

Source: Petition · European Parliament: Save the Freedom of Photography! · Change.org

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Academic subjects alone won’t ‘set every child up for life’

After working in eduction for a number of years, it was becoming clear to me that creativity and the arts were being suffocated and pitted against traditional academic subjects such as English, Maths and Science.

Maybe it was due to government incentives and league tables, but for whatever reason. Creative art departments and, classes were being cut and courses being dropped in favour of triple Sciences, which as an artist, was frustrating to witness.

The Guardian takes a look at this subject in their article: Academic subjects alone won’t ‘set every child up for life’

Employers are crying out for recruits who are creative. The notion that arts and music are not seen as ‘hard’ enough subjects is damaging to the economy

Source: Academic subjects alone won’t ‘set every child up for life’

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Flags – What We Can Learn From Flag Design

For as long as I can remember I have always loved flags! I used to spend hours looking at my giant atlas of the world with the flags in the back. What the do the colours mean? What is the history of the flag? What do the stars, triangles, diagonals mean? What is the story of the badge coat of arms? So many people hold their flags with pride knowing the country they are from whilst without knowing what they represent. For many it’s part of their identity, but what are we identifying with?

These thoughts also come into many aspects of design. Be it logos or architecture, these things in some way represent us and attempt to illustrate what we stand for.

Roman Mars is also obsessed with flags — and after you watch this TED talk, you might be, too.

“These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don’t have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.”

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5 Creative Design & Marketing Elements of the UK General Election 2015

Did you think about the design and how much marketing went into persuading us to vote for a particular party?

Like me did you think how much did it cost to make that big old slab Ed Millibank was carrying around?

Ever wondered how much all this costs and where do these parties get the money from?

Well We take a look at some of the designs and marketing ploys used by today’s politicians to woo us, as well as elements broadcasters have used in the run up to May 7th 2015.

 

 

1. Battle Buses

Buses of all shapes and sizes from all colours of the political spectrum have be covered from top to bottom with large print vinyl and vehicle wraps. Even LBC Radio took to the road in their mobile broadcasting hub.

The Liberal Democrat battle bus (Photo: AFP)
Labour Women Battle Buss
Labour Women Battle Buss © Chris Radburn/PA

2. Stone Mmasonry – Ed’s Tablet/Tombstone

 

3. Good Old Billboards

This year there seems to be a cut back on good honest poster design! To me the I’ve seen better Photoshop skills on Instagram and Twitter. Or maybe that’s just it… they want to make them look amateurish to appeal to the likes of us! Who knows?!

The original Tory election poster featuring Alex Salmond and Ed Miliband (Conservative Party/PA)

The original Tory election poster featuring Alex Salmond and Ed Miliband (Conservative Party/PA)
A UKIP billboard parked up next to Home Park stadium over the May bank holiday weekend
Official UKIP Poster

4. Leafleting (aka Junk Mailing)

Thousands of Great British pounds must have been spent on designers and printers!

Election Junk Mail

5. Election in Music 

ITV News interestingly chose Kanye West’s Power for it’s trailer music, hinting towards a hung parliment or coalition??

The General Election 2015 Campaign on ITV from Alex Dickinson on Vimeo.

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